MRAD Vs MOA

If you’re new to the world of rifle shooting, you may not know what these acronyms mean. MRAD is short for milliradian, and MOA stands for minute of angle. So what does this all mean? 

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Well, if you were looking at a target from 100 yards away and it was 1 inch wide (at 10x magnification), then an MRAD scope would be able to cover 2 inches on that target while an MOA scope could only cover 1 inch. That might sound like a small difference but when shooting long distances or taking shots with extreme precision, those fractions can make all the difference in the world!

MRAD

MRAD stands for milliradian and is a unit of measurement used in shooting. It can also be known as mils, or thousandths of radians. For those unfamiliar with the metric system, this is basically the same thing as degrees but it has been divided by 1000. A target at 100 yards would have an angle subtended by that distance (a full circle) equaling exactly one MRAD on the scope set on ten power magnification (). Most scopes are calibrated out of 2000 because when adjusting elevation.

MOA

MOA stands for minute-of-angle which means each inch represents one degree (.Each moa equals approximately three centimeters). So if you had a rifle scope with 100 MOA of adjustment, you could aim at a target that was 100 yards away and the bullet would land exactly in the center.

A MOA scope could only cover one inch – that might sound like a small difference but when shooting long distances or taking shots with extreme precision those fractions make all the difference in the world!

Since a MOA scope covers less ground than its counterpart it may not take targets as far away into account on each shot; so keep this in mind if you’re planning on making shots at very large ranges. It also means that your crosshairs are much smaller which takes up more of your field of vision.

MOA vs. MRAD

MOA vs MRAD

A MOA scope is best for those who want to make shots at short-medium ranges and need a greater crosshair size that takes up less of their view.

MRADs are better suited for shooters with long range capabilities, but may not be the best choice for someone who doesn’t go on many hunts or shoots in different terrains often because they can take some time to adjust (specifically if you’re using them as binoculars).

This decision might come down to personal preference depending on what type of shooter you are and how much experience you have shooting long distances!

The MRAD system by Barrett offers precise tracking from any angle which means it’s perfect for rifles used in hunting and the military.

MOA Scope Features: No need for adjustments when switching between targets at different ranges, 15 mils subtension lines on turrets provide easy shot measurements. Each MRAD scope has up to 56 milliradian crosshairs which are close together so it takes more time to zoom in or out). These scopes have slightly less magnification power (up to 24X).

MRAD scope features: -consistent accuracy from any angle can be used in all conditions, offers precision tracking and an extended range of view (65x magnifications) with 12 milliradian crosshairs that are 30% larger than MOA scopes.

MOA Scope Features: no need for adjustments when switching between targets at different ranges, 15 mils subtension lines on turrets provide easy shot measurements. Each MRAD scope has up to 56 milliradian crosshairs which are close together so it takes more time to zoom in or out). These scopes have slightly less magnification power (up to 24x).

-Each MRAD scope has up to 56 milliradian crosshairs which are close together so it takes more time to zoom in or out). These scopes have slightly less magnification power (up to 24x)

-TAO MRAD scope offers a 100% accurate shot on target when the turrets are calibrated, and can be used for both long distance shots as well as short distances.

-MRAD turrets provide an increased range of view without sacrificing precision accuracy.

-MOA crosshairs give you easy measurements by providing 15 mil subtension lines that measure up to 60 milliradians per turn and is easier than reading degrees off a compass rose. MOA scopes also offer 30% larger viewing area at 65x magnification level compared with 32x offered by MRA scopes.

-MOA is more precise and offers larger magnification range than MRA scopes.

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Similarities Between MRAD and MOA

MRAD and MOA are both used to measure distance by multiplying the degrees or minutes of a circle with 1000 yards, meters, etc. MRAD is often considered more accurate because it doesn’t have any limitations in measurements like MOA does. In comparison, an mrad measurement can be converted into other types of measurements that can reach greater distances such as feet instead of inches for someone who works with larger scales.

MOA was designed as a simpler way to measure distance without needing any mathematics at all, but has limitations when deciding on how much space an object takes up (it’s only accurate within 30°). This renders it useless for snipers who want precision shooting from long distances – though they will still find use out of these measurements for close-up shots.

MRAD is by far the most preferred way to measure distance because of its accuracy and versatility, but MOA can serve a purpose in niche cases where it’s needed.

The degree or minutes of a circle with either 1000 yards, meters, etc., MRAD is often considered more accurate because it doesn’t have any limitations in measurements like MOA does. In comparison an mrad measurement can be converted into other types of measurements that can reach greater distances such as feet instead of inches for someone who works with larger scales.”

M.O.A. vs M.R.A.D. in Relation to Reticles

Furthermore, it should be noted that milliradians and minutes of angle apply to scope reticles in the same manner that they apply to turrets with the same advantages and disadvantages.

For instance, minutes of angle provide a more precise measurement when the target’s range is short enough that the shooter does not need to quickly adjust the turrets. But, milliradians are more precise at extended ranges and/or when keeping track of fractional adjustments is unwieldy.

In addition, it is very important that you always pair a minute of angle reticle with M.O.A. turrets and milliradian reticles (aka mill-dots) with M.R.A.D turrets and so that there is no confusion between the different types of angular measurements.

Which is Best for Long Range Competition Shooting?

So, if you own a 6.5 creedmoor rifle and you are a long range competition shooter rather than a hunter, choosing a 6.5 creedmoor scope with Milliradian reticles and Milliradian turrets over a rifle scope with Minute of Angle reticles and turrets is a wise idea.

In fact, once you get used to using Milliradians, doing so will not only make it easier for you to make precise adjustments to the point of aim at extended ranges, it will make it easier for you to determine the appropriate number of turns to adjust your turrets for minor differences in the range at which you are shooting.

Thus, while most hunters tend to have a distinct preference for Minute of Angle rifle scopes over Milliradian rifle scopes, M.R.A.D. scopes are by far more popular among long range competition shooters.

MOA Advantages

  • 1/4 MOA adjustments (2.1675”@1000 yards) are nearly twice as refined as 1/10 mil adjustments (3.93701”@1000 yards).
  • MOA is more familiar if you live in a country that uses Imperial measurements.
  • Most ballistic tables are in feet and yards.

MRAD Advantages

  • Base 10 metric values calculate more easily.
  • More high-end equipment is MRAD & more pros use it.
  • The US Military and many other forces around the globe have standardized on MRAD, influencing production & use.

Beyond this, both systems are equally effective. The question is not which is superior but which is better for you. Generally, if you are more comfortable with the Imperial system of measurements (inches, feet, yards), then the MOA system will feel more familiar. If you favor the Metric system (centimeters, meters), then MRAD may quickly seem like an old friend. Whichever system you choose, you will probably require at least a passing understanding of the other because they overlap in some important ways.

  • Many scopes mix the two systems, having a mil dot reticle but turret adjustments in one-quarter minutes of arc.
  • Although math is simpler in the base-10 metric system, most ballistic charts are in imperial measurements, requiring conversion from feet and yards to centimeters and meters.

MOA vs Mrad Scope

So, like MOA, a mile MRAD is just an angular measurement. The difference is, while there are 21,600 minutes in a circle, there are 6.2832 radians in a circle, and each radian has 1000 milliradians in it, so there are 6,283.2 milliradians per circle. … So if you hate the metric system, you might want to stick with MOA.

FAQs

Mrad works by making adjustments in fractions of an inch at 100 yards. Every click of adjustment equals 1/10th MOA or 0.36 inches at 100 yards, equivalent to 36 inches at 1000 yards.

To understand the difference in size between 0.1 millirad and 1 millimeter, it’s essential to look at how many inches each is equivalent. Approximately 3/8 of an inch for a millimeter and about 6 inches for a millirad

The United States Army uses both MOA and mil measurements to measure targets on a map or range. There are two different shooting disciplines: long-range rifle shooting (which utilizes MOA) and military sniping (which uses mil). 

Conclusion

Consequently, because M.O.A. scopes provide shooters with a higher degree of accuracy at relatively close ranges of 300 yards or less where no fine adjustments are needed, M.O.A. Scopes are often the best choice for hunters. However, for long range precision shooting, M.R.A.D scopes are actually a better choice because they provide a higher degree of accuracy at relatively long ranges.

Double major in Engineering and Geology at the University of Minnesota. Experienced shooter & hunter for over 15 years. Certified NRA officer for over 10 years working as a writer at Ballachy.com .

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